When the Dollar is no Longer the World’s Reserve Currency

1838-C Quarter Eagle NGC AU58

Gone with the Wind – Charlotte (Mint)

The 1838-C quarter eagle is an extremely popular coin among early gold enthusiasts. It is a first-year-of-issue and one of just two Charlotte quarter eagles that use the Classic Head, obverse mintmark design. All known examples exhibit a re-punched mintmark, that was initially entered too low. Writing in his Charlotte Mint gold coins reference (2008), Doug Winter says the 1838-C quarter eagle “Usually seen in VF and EF grades, it becomes very scarce in properly graded AU55 to AU58 and rare in Uncirculated.” NGC has recognized only a dozen uncirculated pieces.

Offered at $15,500 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1914-S Indian Eagle PCGS MS65

Gem; Just Two Graded Higher

Here is a most impressive survivor from among this moderately low-mintage San Francisco issue – the 14th lowest mintage of the series. While its ranking makes sense when discussing circulated coins, when strictly uncirculated examples are considered, the issue is among the scarcest all ten-dollar Indians. Additionally, it’s seldom available with both problem-free surfaces and in high grade.  This one features lovely color and a highly pleasing overall appearance.

Similar to other S-mint Indian tens, the 1914-S is a significant condition rarity. This issue saw a mintage of 208,000 pieces and is relatively easy to obtain in circulated grades. Most Mint State examples grade MS60 to MS63, and are obtainable with patience and searching. Near-Gems are scarce and MS65 and finer pieces are rare. The PCGS population is only 12 with 2 graded higher (one of which is an MS65+). That helps to explain why we have not auctioned a PCGS MS65 since way back in 2007! This one features lovely color and a highly pleasing overall appearance. 

Offered at $36,950 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1880-CC GSA Morgan Dollar NGC MS66

Perennially Popular

Despite the substantial number of 1880-CC silver dollars that were released in the 1970s through the General Services Administration, few match the quality of this frosty, nearly color-free example. This piece remains in its original GSA plastic holder with an NGC grading band affixed to the holder.

Offered at $4,500 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1876 Sailor Head Pattern Dollar High R.7 NGC PR67RB

Extremely Rare

Judd-1465, Pollock-1616. A bill was passed by the House of Representatives in 1876, providing for the resumption of silver dollar coinage on a large scale. In response, Chief Engraver William Barber prepared a series of patterns for the prospective coinage, featuring different versions of his beautiful “Sailor Head” design. On August 11, 1876, Superintendent Pollock sent a specimen of Judd-1465 to Mint Director Henry Linderman for consideration as a possible design for the silver dollar. Linderman was enthusiastic, saying, “…altogether this Head of Liberty may be regarded as equal if not superior to any heretofore prepared at the Mint.” The sponsoring bill was defeated in the Senate, and silver dollar coinage was delayed until 1878, when the famous Morgan dollar design made its debut. Judd-1465 is a very rare issue, as USPatterns.com lists just six coins on their roster of known specimens. This is the single highest graded example by either NGC or PCGS!

Offered at $41,250 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

Five Dollar Gold Piece PCGS AU55

Very Rare C. Bechtler

50G. 20C. K-15, R.7.  America’s first gold rush took place in the piedmont area of North Carolina and Georgia in the 1820s and ’30s. The expanding economy of the region desperately needed a more dependable medium of exchange than the miner’s gold dust could provide. Christopher Bechtler, a German-born goldsmith and watchmaker, established a private mint at Rutherford, North Carolina to process gold dust from the region into useful coinage. Beginning in 1831, he and his family began producing gold coins of simple design that circulated widely in the Southern United States until the Civil War. He was an honest and competent metallurgist and his accurate assays ensured his coins were of full weight and value. Bechtler began marking his coins with their exact weight and/or gold content in carats with his second series of coinage in 1831. This example is far more lustrous in-hand. The PCGS population is only 6 with 5 higher.

Offered at $52,750 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1868-S Seated Liberty Quarter PCGS MS65

A Rare Gem of a Sitting Lady

The 1868-S Seated Liberty quarter claims a mintage of 96,000 pieces, all struck from a single pair of dies. There was little interest in branch mint issues before about 1893, as most 19th century collectors were content to concentrate on date runs, acquiring a nice specimen from any Mint (often Philadelphia Mint proofs) to update their collection every year. As a result, few high-quality examples were saved by contemporary collectors and the 1868-S is very rare in high grade today. The current PCGS population is only 3 with 3 higher.

Offered at $13,800 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1842 Large Date Liberty Eagle NGC MS61

Scarce, Flashy Unc.

Although the Guide Book mintage for the Large Date variety is multiples of its Small Date counterpart, the two issues are similarly priced, and approximately equal in rarity. This is the only MS61 to be graded by NGC and just two have been graded higher. The one we offer here is – and we’re about to play our broken record, once more – is lighter, as well as more lustrous and attractive than seen in our lackluster images. 

Offered at $13,800 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1875-S Twenty Cent Piece PCGS MS67

A Mere 1 Graded Higher

The twenty-cent denomination is one of the great failures in American numismatics. There was never any great need for it. Its use was limited to the West, where consumers would often pay a quarter for items worth a bit (one reale, or 12.5 cents) and receive a dime back in change. Copper did not circulate in the Pacific states, so consumers were often shortchanged by two cents. The twenty-cent denomination was suggested by Nevada Senator John P. Jones as a way of solving that problem. It never caught on, and the denomination was abandoned for circulation in 1876, one year after it was first introduced. The example herein offered is noticeably lighter and more lustrous than is discernible from our images. The PCGS population is only 6 with 1 higher.

Offered at $18,500 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1879-CC Capped Die Morgan Dollar PCGS MS65

Rare CC $1

A Top 100 Variety. The Capped Die 1879-CC dollar has long been known, but decades ago, they were shunned by collectors who thought something was not quite right about the mintmark area. Scholarship has made great strides since those days, and now the so-called Capped Die coins are worth a premium in the better grades of Uncirculated. The one offered here is noticeably lighter, as well as more lustrous and appealing, than seen in our drab images. The PCGS population is only 11 with 5 (barely) higher, as all of the latter are 65+ examples.

Offered at $41, 750 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.

1895 Morgan Dollar PCGS PR62

Brilliant Morgan King

In 1895, the Mint struck 880 proof Morgan dollars for distribution in the annual silver proof sets. However, unlike in other years, plans to strike circulation coins came and went with, at most, a brief “hurrah” that never even made it out of the Mint. Mint records indicate that 12,000 circulation strikes were made, but none have ever been known to collectors. It’s often debated whether the coins were actually struck (and later melted) or if their “coinage” was nothing more than an accounting error on the Mint’s books. Contemporary numismatists, such as the Chapman brothers, believed that no circulation strikes were ever produced. Modern research clouds the water on this point, but with no circulation strikes known, one inherent fact remains: the 1895 Morgan dollar is only known in proof format. And therein lies its status as the “king of the Morgan dollars.” This example is virtually color-free and (contrary to how it appears in our images) highly brilliant.

Offered at $54,950 delivered

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you. Give us a call for price indications and to lock trades.

(800) 257.3253
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage

Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.