Just 5 Graded Higher – 1879-CC Capped Die Morgan Dollar PCGS MS65

A Top 100 Variety. Carson City Morgan dollar collectors have long been aware of the “Capped Die” variety, named after the myriad minute die chips in the vicinity of the mintmark of the VAM-3 1879-CC. The first plausible theory for the die chips was provided by Morgan dollar researcher Leroy Van Allen, who suggested in 1965 that the wrong size (Small CC) mintmark was initially entered, and the chips were an attempt to efface remnants of the Small CC before the Large CC was tapped into the reverse die. Thus, VAM-3 is a Large Over Small CC variety, and it has long been separately listed in the Guide Book.

The PCGS population is 15 with 5 graded higher – none higher than MS65+.

Listed at $43,200 in the CDN CPG and $47,500 in the NGC price guide.

Offered at $41,780

Pop 1, Only 1 Graded Higher – 1862-S Liberty Half Eagle MS61

While the Civil War effectively ended the circulation of gold and silver coinage up and down the East Coast, hard money remained in the channels of Western commerce throughout that fraught period in American history. The San Francisco Mint struck 9,500 half eagles in 1862, nearly all of which ended up in circulation. Probably three or four pieces survive in Mint State, at best, and the entire population of 1862-S five-dollar gold pieces is likely smaller than 100 coins. 

The PCGS population is 1 with only 1 graded higher.

Listed at $67,500 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $59,100

1854-S Liberty Double Eagle PCGS AU50

The San Francisco Mint began coinage operations in 1854, occupying the same building that previously housed the U.S. Assay Office of Gold, which produced the iconic $50 octagonal “slugs” of the Gold Rush period. Coinage during the first several months though was stunted due to a lack of parting acids needed for ore refinement. The double eagle mintage at San Francisco of 1854 was only 141,468 pieces, which would prove to be the lowest total coinage of this denomination at the West Coast branch mint. Surviving examples of the 1854-S double eagle are scarce in high AU grades and borderline rare in attractive Mint State condition. 

Listed at $15,000 in the CDN CPG and $17,500 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $15,150

Tied for Highest Graded – 1935-S Texas PCGS MS68

With 10,000 coins distributed to collectors (and eight pieces reserved for assay), the 1935-S Texas commemorative half dollar fails to distinguish itself as a rarity in the series. Indeed, examples are plentiful through most grades, including MS63 all the way up through MS67. It is at this stratospheric level, however, that the issue becomes a genuine condition rarity.

The PCGS population is just 6 with none graded higher.

Listed at $11,200 in the CDN CPG and $14,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $9,600

Tied for Highest Graded – 1903-S Liberty Half Eagle PCGS MS67

An unremarkable production of more than 1.8 million half eagles was accomplished at the San Francisco Mint in 1903. The 1903-S five is widely collectible through MS63 and even MS64. Examples in Gem and Premium Gem grades are scarce, while Superb Gems of this quality are condition rarities.

The PCGS population is only 5 with none graded higher.

Listed at $16,200 in the CDN CPG and $20,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $15,500

Tied for Highest Graded – 1884 Seated Liberty Dime PCGS MS68

Unlike the quarters and halves, a large number of dimes were struck in 1884. In fact, more than 3.3 million pieces were produced. Despite the large mintage, surprisingly few coins were set aside in the ultimate grades. This particular example offers highly attractive ocean-blue peripheries with golden-brown and red fields. While typical mint state survivors certainly aren’t rare, at the MS68 level this date is a formidable conditional rarity,

The PCGS population is only 3 with none graded higher.

Listed at $17,500 in the PCGS price guide

Offered at $11,800

Just 1 Graded Higher (and Barely) – 1861 Gold Dollar PCGS MS67

Like other gold denominations, gold dollars were minted in generous quantities in 1861, a year that saw a large influx of the yellow metal from out West. After the outbreak of the Civil War, gold and silver were quickly driven out of circulation by hoarding, so it is unsurprising to find that the 1861, with its mintage of 527,150 pieces, is readily collectible in Mint State grades through MS62 and MS63. Even near-Gems do not pose much of an issue. The certified population thins out in MS65 and drops precipitously beyond that.

The PCGS population is only 3 with 1 graded higher, the latter being an MS67+ example.

Listed at $24,000 in the CDN CPG and $30,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $23,100

Blazer of a 1935 Peace Dollar PCGS MS66+

The 1935 is the last Peace dollar from the Philadelphia Mint. It is typically seen in MS65 and lower grades, although Premium Gems are collectible for patient specialists. This one exhibits highly lustrous, color-fee surfaces and excellent eye-appeal.

The PCGS population is 132 with 16 graded higher.

Listed at $12,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $5,300

Price reflected is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire or Check. Add 3.5% for Major CC & PayPal.

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(800) 257.3253 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
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1922 Grant No Star Gold Dollar PCGS MS68

The Grant gold dollars and silver half dollars were issued on behalf of the Ulysses S. Grant Centenary Memorial Association, and that entity selected Laura Gardin Fraser to prepare the designs. A notice appeared in the January 24, 1922 issue of The Cincinnati Enquirer:
There will be minted 10,000 $1 gold pieces and 250,000 silver half dollars, the first to sell for $2.50 each and the second for $1 each. This fund will assure the tri-fold purposes of the association which is interested in the construction of a memorial highway from this city to the east along the Ohio River. After the minting the dies will be destroyed, thus giving the coins a high numismatic value.”

This is one of only two examples to have received this grade from PCGS with none graded higher. Listed at $40,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $39,500

Rare 1805 Draped Bust Quarter Eagle

John Dannreuther makes the point that the “mintage figure for this year may be one of the firmest to date, as it is believed that all 1,781 coins delivered in 1805 were of that date… .” This was the only die pair used to strike those coins, and it was later employed in the production of 1806 BD-1 and BD-2 quarter eagles, 1807 BD-1 quarter eagles, and 1807 JR-1 dimes. The dual-denomination nature of the dies certainly adds to the appeal of this scarce issue. Only 100 to 150 pieces are thought to exist.

The PCGS population is just 2 with 9 graded higher.

Listed at $31,200 (in AU58) in the CDN CPG and $40,000 in the PCGS price guide.

Offered at $31,100

Price reflected is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire or Check. Add 3.5% for Major CC & PayPal.

We do business the old fashioned way, we speak with you.

(800) 257.3253 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM CST M-F
Private, Portable, Divisible Wealth Storage