Ultra Rare, Stunning 1884 Liberty Eagle NGC PR66 Ultra Cameo

Only 45 proof Liberty eagles were struck in 1884, the lowest production total for any gold denomination that year. Thirty pieces were delivered for inclusion in the proof sets on January 19, with another 15 coins delivered at intervals throughout the year. The proof sets were almost all broken up in the early-mid 20th century, due to pressure from date collectors seeking an example of the double eagle, which was a proof-only issue. PCGS CoinFacts estimates the surviving population of the proof eagle at 16-20 examples in all grades. This is a spectacular looking example with extraordinary eye appeal. Unpriced in both the NGC and PCGS price guides in this grade and designation. It is tied with one other for highest graded by NGC, while PCGS hasn’t graded a Deep Cameo higher than PR65.

Offered at $121,000

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Superb 1875-S Twenty Cent Piece NGC MS67

The twenty cent denomination is one of the great failures in American numismatics. There was never any great need for it. Its use was limited to the West, where consumers would often pay a quarter for items worth a bit (one reale, or 12.5 cents) and receive a dime back in change. Copper did not circulate in the Pacific states, so consumers were often shortchanged by two cents. The twenty cent denomination was suggested by Nevada Senator John P. Jones as a way of solving that problem. It never caught on, and the denomination was abandoned for circulation in 1876, one year after it was first introduced. The 1875-S is the most plentiful issue in the short-lived series, claiming a mintage of 1.1 million coins. The NGC census stands at just 8 with 1 higher. Listed at $24,200 in both the CDN CPG and NGC price guide.

Offered at $22,000

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Libertas Americana medal realizes $17,435 in DNW sale

Courtesy of World Coin News Staff Posted on March 20, 2019.


Top billing at DNW’s February coin and medal sale: 1781 Libertas Americana medal, designed by Benjamin Franklin and Esprit-Antoine Gibelin and engraved by Augustin Dupré, which took $17,435 in PCGS MS62 BN. (Images courtesy and © DNW, London)

The American War of Independence achieved top billing at Dix Noonan Webb’s late February coin and medal sale.

On offer was a 47 mm bronze medal engraved by Augustin Dupré celebrating the impending independence of the United States. The design is credited to Benjamin Franklin and Esprit-Antoine Gibelin.

The obverse shows a bust of Liberty complete with flowing hair, liberty cap, and staff.

The reverse has Minerva, representing France as indicated by the fleur-de-lis on her shield, fending off the attack of the British lion on the baby Hercules, who represents the newly emergent American nation. Hercules is strangling a serpent in each hand. The snakes stand for the British armies defeated at the critical Battles of Saratoga and Yorktown (Betts 615; BDM I, 647).

The motto NON SINE DIIS ANIMOSUS INFANS is from Horace’s ode “Descende coelo” and translates “Not without gods is the infant courageous.”

The two dates with a common month, 17 OCT. 1777 and 19 OCT. 1781 in exergue, signify the American victories at Saratoga and Yorktown.

The medals were minted in Paris in gold, silver, and bronze with restrikes made at a later date. Copies were given to the King and Queen of France, the Heads of State of countries friendly to the United States, and important U.S. politicians.

The medal is rare, and in PCGS MS62 BN with just a few inconsequential marks was something of a steal when it realized just $17,435 [£13,200] on a not unreasonable £15,000-£18,000 estimate.

Gem 1908-D Motto Saint Gaudens Double Eagle NGC MS66

1908 D “Motto” Double Eagle Obverse

In 1908, Congress passed legislation to restore the motto IN GOD WE TRUST to the double eagle and other denominations, which had been omitted by Saint-Gaudens and President Roosevelt during the designing process in 1907. The motto was incorporated into the rays above the sun on the reverse. Double eagle coinage at Denver in 1908 included more than 663,000 No Motto coins and 349,500 With Motto pieces. The latter type is available through MS65 but is conditionally elusive in MS66 condition. The NGC census stands at just 7 with 7 higher. NGC price guide is $23,000


1908 D “Motto” Double Eagle Reverse

Offered at $17,250 delivered

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Tied for Highest Graded 1901 Liberty Eagle PCGS MS67

We have not offered an MS67 at auction since 2008! The population for this date and grade remains unchanged from what it was back then. This particular specimen is sharply detailed and features satiny luster and a pristine appearance. Tied with six others at NGC (and one at PCGS) for the highest graded. Listed at $29,000 in the NGC price guide.

Offered at $24,200 delivered

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2015-W $100 High Relief PCGS MS 70 “PL” Proof Like First Strike Moy

Moy pop of only 20 coins
Out of the entire 50,000 mintage, PCGS has only graded 123 total MS 70 PL coins.  That is .002 of a percent that made the PL!  That’s quite a small amount.  Since there initial release in 2015, we’ve submitted thousands of coins and none have made a 69 or 70 PL designation.  It’s a very good chance, these are the only coins available.
We have not offered a 2015 $100 HR MS 70 PL Moy since January 2017.  A very elusive coin!!

1 coin available at $12,650

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CNG’s Triton XXII realizes $10.5 million

Posted on February 26, 2019 by World Coin News Staff

Masterwork: Kimon’s rendering of the nymph Arethousa dominates this Sicilian silver tetradrachm of the Second Democracy c. 406-405 BCE. The quality of this piece caused the CNG cataloger to wax poetic: “The composition’s beautiful three-dimensional perspective is augmented by a fluid style that effectively conveys the natural motion of the nymph’s hair in her liquid environment. [That] environment is further emphasized by the placement of the dolphins, who weave themselves within her hair in a playful manner. The serenity of Arethousa’s countenance, with her full, pouting lips and other-worldly gaze from her almond-shaped eyes, conveys a sense of her place aloof from the realm of man.” In EF the coin romped away to take $270,000. (Images courtesy CNG)In late January, the Classical Numismatic Group announced that their annual Triton sale had realized $10,482,153 on pre-sale total estimates of $7,831,550.

The catalog featured 1,456 lots of Greek, Celtic, Oriental Greek, Central Asian, Roman Provincial, Roman Republican & Imperatorial, and Roman Imperial coinage.

Thrown in for good measure was a selection of Byzantine, Early Medieval, Islamic, World, and British coinage plus a number of choice large lots.

Four outstanding collections dominated the sale:

• The Gasvoda Collection consisted of exceptional Greek and Roman coins with an emphasis on Magna Graecia and Sicily. It realized $3,047,376 on a $1,850,700 estimate.

• Seleukid coinage from the MNL Collection took $282,270 on a $172,250 estimate.

• The Michel Prieur Collection of Syro-Phoenician silver coinage sold for $500,844 on a $216,550 estimate.

• Roman Republican coins from the Alan J. Harlan Collection fetched $435,810 on a $273,950 estimate.

Top-selling lot from the Gasvoda Collection was a Sicilian silver tetradrachm by Kimon (26mm, 17.44 g) from the Second Democracy c. 406-405 BCE. The head of the nymph Arethousa fills much of the obverse, her sea-swept hair radiant about her. Adjectives fail to adequately describe this superb artwork. It is a true masterwork in the original sense of that word.

On the reverse, a charioteer drives his quadriga at breakneck speed with Nike hovering above waiting to crown him with a laurel wreath.

Graded EF with underlying luster, this coin shot past its $150,000 estimate to hammer at $225,000 for a total of $270,000.

A second tetradrachm came from the MNL collection and was sourced from the Seleukid Empire of Demetrios I Soter c. 155/4-150 BCE (31mm, 16.68 g). The obverse shows the king’s effigy within a laurel wreath in high relief. The reverse has Tyche seated (SC-1611.3).

Tetradrachm of the Seleukid Empire struck for Demetrios I Soter c. 155/4-150 BCE, which realized $14,400 in EF. (Images courtesy CNG)

In EF, it realized $14,400 on an estimate of $3,000.

Tetradrachm struck at Hierapolis for the Caracalla c. 215-217 CE whose reverse is devoted to cult figures of Haddad. An extremely rare coin, it fetched $16,800 in gVF, or over 5 times estimate. (Images courtesy CNG)

Top lot from the Michel Prieur Collection was a third tetradrachm (25mm, 10.58 g) struck at Hierapolis for Caracalla c. 215-217 CE (Prieur 925). The emperor is shown laureate, draped, and cuirassed. On the reverse are cult figures of Haddad seated on bulls and Atargatis seated on lions. Between is a semeion surmounted by a golden pigeon. All are supported by an eagle.

This is an extremely rare coin. Prieur cites just four examples. In gVF and toned, it made a most comfortable $16,800 on a highly conservative $5,000 estimate.

Silver denarius of Roman moneyer T. Carisius struck in 46 CE with a design that echoes a 350-300 BCE coin produced in the city of Gergis, near the site of Troy. In superb EF, it realized $5,700. (Images courtesy CNG)

From A.J. Harlan’s Imperial Roman coins came an exceptional example of a silver denarius (17 mm, 4.05 g) struck by moneyer T. Carisius for Imperatorial Rome c. 46 BCE. On the obverse, the head of Sibyl Herophile is displayed with her hair decorated with jewels and enclosed in bands. On the reverse is a Sphinx.

As the cataloger notes, this coin’s design shows that Roman moneyers were familiar with the legends and coin types of obscure Greek cities. In this instance, the city is Gergis, sited near ancient Troy. It was said to be the birthplace of the Sibyl Herophile, a priestess with prophetic powers. Coins of the city struck c. 350-300 BCE show the head of the Sibyl and a seated sphinx, a symbol of prophecy. These themes are repeated here.

Given its superb EF condition, the coin realized $5,700, or well over three times estimate.

Full catalog details and prices realized can be found at the CNG website: www.cngcoins.com. On the list, the number of each lot is hot-linked to the catalog description.

Prices and totals cited here included a buyer’s premium of 20%. However, those bidding online and who used The Saleroom.com would have paid 22.5%.

CNG is currently accepting consignments for its next mail bid auction, CNG 111, scheduled for May 8.

This article was originally printed in World Coin News.

Tied for Highest Graded 1904 Liberty Quarter Eagle NGC MS68

This little jewel is obviously one of the finest survivors for this issue. It features satiny, golden surfaces that exhibit no noticeable abrasions or other imperfections. Additionally, it’s fully struck and boasts a great overall appearance. It is particularly well suited for a collector who is looking for a fabulous Liberty quarter eagle to include in a top-notch gold type set, or someone who simply buys great coins. The NGC population is 8 with none higher. Listed at $27,500 in the NGC price guide.

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Offered at $19,250


Three 65’s from “99“ – 1899 Liberty Double Eagles PCGS/NGC MS65

Despite a mintage of more than 1.6 million coins, few 1899 twenties survive in high grades. In fact, the combined NGC and PCGS population for MS65 grade examples is fewer than 200 coins and the two companies together have graded only 9 pieces higher. Listed at $8,120 in the CDN CPG, $7,500 in the PCGS price guide, $10,750 in the NGC price guide and $8,500 in Trends. Those numbers speak for themselves…

We have three coins available…

Offered at $5,990 each delivered

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