1934-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar NGC MS67

Tied for Highest Graded

After several years of low mintages and intermittent production, Walking Liberty half dollar production increased dramatically in 1934, and production remained stable until the series ended in 1947. Production at the three mints averaged 2.8 million coins per issue from 1916 to 1933, and 10.6 million from 1934 to 1947. That is one of the reasons that some collectors only seek the latter issues, the so-called “short set” of Walking Liberty half dollars. This one is somewhat lighter in brighter in hand, as compared to our images. The NGC population is just 9 (two of which are NGC Star-designated examples) with none higher.

Offered at $12,950 delivered

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1889 Morgan Dollar NGC MS67

 1 of 5, None Higher

A substantial mintage of 21.7 million Morgan dollars was accomplished at the Philadelphia Mint in 1889, making the issue readily available in lower Mint State grades. However, many examples seen were struck from overused dies and high-grade specimens with a sharp strike are not at all plentiful. At the MS67 grade level the 1889 is a prime condition rarity. In fact, this is one of only five so-graded at NGC, with none higher. This particular example is more vibrant and colorful, when viewed in-hand.

Offered at $8,250 delivered

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1875-S Twenty Cent Piece PCGS MS67

A Mere 1 Graded Higher

The twenty-cent denomination is one of the great failures in American numismatics. There was never any great need for it. Its use was limited to the West, where consumers would often pay a quarter for items worth a bit (one reale, or 12.5 cents) and receive a dime back in change. Copper did not circulate in the Pacific states, so consumers were often shortchanged by two cents. The twenty-cent denomination was suggested by Nevada Senator John P. Jones as a way of solving that problem. It never caught on, and the denomination was abandoned for circulation in 1876, one year after it was first introduced. The example herein offered is noticeably lighter and more lustrous than is discernible from our images. The PCGS population is only 6 with 1 higher.

Offered at $18,500 delivered

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1886 Liberty Nickel NGC MS67

Tied with One Other for Highest Graded

The 1886 Liberty nickel claims a small mintage of 3.3 million pieces and the issue is generally considered the second-rarest date of the series, just slightly behind the 1885. However, in high-grade condition, the 1886 is actually rarer than its 1885 counterpart. The one offered here is sharp and lustrous, not to mention (thankfully), an obvious business strike. This is one of just two so-graded by NGC, with none higher. For its part, PCGS has recognized three MS67’s with none higher, either.

Offered at $41,000 delivered

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1934-S Peace Dollar NGC MS67

The ONLY One, None Graded Higher

The San Francisco Mint was tasked to strike Peace dollars on October 26, 1934, leaving just over one month to complete production for the year. Understandably, only a small mintage of 1.1 million pieces was accomplished. Relatively few examples were saved for numismatic purposes in the 1930s, as collectors failed to appreciate the elusive nature of the issue. As a result, the 1934-S is famously the scarcest Peace dollar in Mint State, overall. The bulk of the survivors are in the MS62 to MS64 grade range, with gems being much more elusive, and higher-grade coins, rare. This is the only MS67 (with none higher) at either NGC or PCGS. In hand, this beast is lighter, more lustrous and more eye-appealing than seen in our images.

Offered at $115,000 delivered

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1891-S Morgan Dollar NGC MS67

None Higher at NGC – Frosty-White

In the 2014 reference Morgan Dollar, Michael Standish writes: “John Love recalls five bags full of low-grade Uncirculated 1891-S Morgans being part of LaVere Redfield’s hoard of silver dollars.” This corresponds to the moderate availability of this date through MS64. In Gem condition, however, the 1891-S emerges as a better date among San Francisco Morgans, and in MS66 it is genuinely rare. At the MS67 grade level, there are only 4 so-graded by NGC, including the present example.

Offered at $12,900 delivered

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1916 Standing Liberty Quarter NGC MS67FH

The 1916 is unique in the series in several respects, not least among them the fact that it is the only date showing, what was at the time of issue, a knowingly unfinished design. Although nearly identical to MacNeil’s original models, the Mint produced a significantly lower relief coin with an inferior level of sharpness. Trial impressions of this version were initially approved by Mint Director F.H. von Engelken, but correspondence suggests that the director had later become unhappy with the softness of the obverse details. By the time improvements were made to the sharpness of the design, the engraving department was preparing 1917-dated hubs and the improvements were only implemented on hubs for 1917 coinage. A token quantity of 52,000 Standing Liberty quarters was struck at the tail end of 1916. This issue is now regarded as one of the most significant key dates in the series. In hand, the surfaces are considerably lighter and more lustrous looking. The NGC population stands at just four with none higher.

Offered at $132,500 delivered

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1854 T-1 Gold Dollar NGC MS67

Tied for Highest Graded

The mintage for the 1854 gold dollar was not as large as the preceding three P-mint gold dollar deliveries; however, it was still a respectable 855,502 pieces. It’s not surprising, therefore, that this issue remains popular among type collectors who desire an attractive representative of James Longacre’s Type One design. While the average collector would happily settle for an MS64 or MS65 example, gold specialists who pride themselves on unrivaled numismatic beauty should go for this beauty. The NGC population is just 10 with none higher.

Offered at $12,900 delivered

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1888-O Morgan Dollar NGC MS67

1 of only 2 So Graded

Here is a superb, attractively toned example of a true condition rarity. Its surfaces are satin-like in appearance and exceptionally well preserved. In hand, the patina is a bit lighter and the luster, somewhat brighter than seen in our images. Tied with just one other (which is ex-Eliasberg) for the highest graded by NGC. For its part, PCGS has graded just one MS67, with none higher. The aforementioned Eliasberg coin was last auctioned by us in 2014.

Offered at $9,775 delivered

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1879 Morgan Dollar PCGS MS67

Tied for Highest Graded

Offered here is a frosty, white example with exemplary surfaces and a great overall appearance. Not particularly tough to come by through the MS66 grade level, but very rarely seen in this state of preservation. The last PCGS representative we auctioned was all the way back in 2007! Tied with 7 others for the highest graded by PCGS.

Offered at $37,375 delivered

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Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.