1909-D Indian Eagle PCGS MS66

One of the Finest Survivors

Ex O’neal. The 1909-D is one of the scarcer issues among early ten-dollar Indians, and is much more challenging than its mintage of 121,540 pieces would seem to indicate. David Akers contends in A Handbook of 20th-Century United States Gold Coins that it is one of the most underrated issues in the series, and is actually one of the rarest in an absolute sense. “Even in MS60 this issue is very rare and in MS63 or MS64 condition, it can be located only with great difficulty,” says Akers. The PCGS population is only 4 with 2 higher. 

Offered at $47,800 delivered

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1929 Indian Half Eagle PCGS MS65

None Graded Higher

Only the Philadelphia Mint coined gold in 1929, and production was focused on the double eagle denomination. The 1929 half eagle is, in terms of total population, the rarest Indian Head five in the series. Several hundred pieces survive, primarily in Mint State, since this issue never circulated. However, the PCGS population report shows only 12 at this grade level with NONE HIGHER. Nor has NGC graded any higher, either. In other words, an MS65 is as good as it gets for this date. This one is lustrous and attractive.

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Offered at $106, 400 delivered

(800) 257.3253
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1929 Indian Half Eagle PCGS MS64

Last Year-Of-Issue Rarity

The Indian Head half eagle series was short-lived. Yet, it comprised a number of highly elusive dates, none more so than the 1929. Although the 1909-O is perhaps more recognizable to the uninitiated thanks to its low mintage of 34,200 coins, the 1929 is rarer in the absolute sense with a survival rate approximately 50% lower than its New Orleans counterpart. The Mint struck 662,000 five-dollar gold pieces that year, but nearly the entire mintage was held in reserve and eventually melted after the Gold Recall of 1933. Coins that avoided the melting pot are apt to be found in AU to Uncirculated condition, generally MS61 to MS63.

Offered at $35,750 delivered

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1908-D Indian Half Eagle NGC MS65

Rare First Year of Issue

The Philadelphia issue was the chief beneficiary of public hoarding when Bela Lyon Pratt’s Indian Head half eagle made its debut in 1908, and is readily available in most grades today. Its Denver counterpart, however, boasts a surviving population that is more in line with later issues: The date is available in grades through MS64 but becomes a rarity at the Gem level. In fact, he NGC population is only 7 with none higher.

Offered at $22,750 delivered

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1907 Rolled Edge $10 Indian PCGS MS65

Breathtaking Rarity

Struck in September 1907, the “Rolled Edge”) 1907 Indian eagle is one of the rarest issues in the series, surpassed only by the 1933. It retains the smooth, sculpted details of Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ original Wire Rim models but with a defined border that Chief Engraver Charles Barber turned into the die in an effort to improve stacking of the coins. Although 31,500 pieces were struck, most of the coins never left the Mint, as all but 50 were melted. In Renaissance of American Coinage, 1905-1908, Roger Burdette lists 10 pieces as having gone to the Mint Bureau, two to the Metropolitan Art Museum, and eight to Mint officials, which left 30 pieces on hand at the Mint that could be acquired by collectors. Although understandably, most have been carefully preserved, the PCGS population is still just 17 with 19 higher (no doubt, including a fair number of re-submissions).

Offered at $299,900 delivered

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1914-S Indian Eagle PCGS MS65

Gem; Just Two Graded Higher

Here is a most impressive survivor from among this moderately low-mintage San Francisco issue – the 14th lowest mintage of the series. While its ranking makes sense when discussing circulated coins, when strictly uncirculated examples are considered, the issue is among the scarcest all ten-dollar Indians. Additionally, it’s seldom available with both problem-free surfaces and in high grade.  This one features lovely color and a highly pleasing overall appearance.

Similar to other S-mint Indian tens, the 1914-S is a significant condition rarity. This issue saw a mintage of 208,000 pieces and is relatively easy to obtain in circulated grades. Most Mint State examples grade MS60 to MS63, and are obtainable with patience and searching. Near-Gems are scarce and MS65 and finer pieces are rare. The PCGS population is only 12 with 2 graded higher (one of which is an MS65+). That helps to explain why we have not auctioned a PCGS MS65 since way back in 2007! This one features lovely color and a highly pleasing overall appearance. 

Offered at $36,950 delivered

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1908 Indian Quarter Eagle NGC PR68

1 of Only 2 So-Graded

With the new coinage designs of 1907 and 1908, the mint recognized these coins could not be produced by the conventional brilliant proofing method. Their solution was to sandblast the coins, producing a matte surface; a finish that had been applied to some mint medals for decades. However, the mint’s main customers for proofs were coin collectors, and collectors were generally not familiar with the matte proofing technique or appearance. The result was general dislike by the collecting community and dwindling sales for proof gold until the final year in 1915. There were 236 proof quarter eagles produced, and it is estimated that 100 to 120 pieces are extant today. The surfaces on this piece border on perfection. This is one of only two so-graded by NGC, with none higher.

Offered at $63,250 delivered

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1908 Indian Quarter Eagle PCGS PR66

First Year Matte Proof

With the new coinage designs of 1907 and 1908, the mint recognized these coins could not be produced by the conventional brilliant proofing method. Their solution was to sandblast the coins, producing a matte surface; a finish that had been applied to some mint medals for decades. However, the mint’s main customers for proofs were coin collectors, and collectors were generally not familiar with the matte proofing technique or appearance. The result was general dislike by the collecting community and dwindling sales for proof gold until the final year in 1915. There were 236 proof quarter eagles produced, and it is estimated that 100 to 120 pieces are extant today. The sandblast surfaces on this piece exhibit the khaki-brown color this date is known for. The PCGS population is 18 with 11 higher. 

Offered at $34,500 delivered

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First Year 1907 No Motto Indian Eagles PCGS AU58 & PCGS MS61

A Special Offering

Saint-Gaudens’ initial design for the Indian eagle did not include the motto IN GOD WE TRUST, but the inscription was added in 1908, creating a popular two-year design type. The 1907 issue is the go-to No Motto type-coin for many collectors. And that makes perfect sense, as it’s a first- year-of-issue of a two-year type. We have the following available for sale:

PCGS AU-58 (20 coins available) Offered at $1,195/each

PCGS MS-61 (18 coins available) Offered at $1,265/each

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1910 Indian Half Eagle PCGS PR64

Gorgeous Roman Finish Proof $5

The year 1908 marked the beginning of the Indian Head design type, the first major design change on that denomination since 1839. The new design, issued in the unique sunken relief format, encouraged the Mint to make another change to normal coinage practices: altering the finish of proof coins from polished fields to a sandblast texturing similar to that employed on some art and award medals. Thus, this issue is a first of American coinage in many ways and today is sought-after both as a type coin and as an intriguing element of early 20th century Mint experimentation. In hand, this example is lighter and considerably more vibrant than seen in our images. The PCGS population is just 13 with 13 higher. 

Offered at $25,300 delivered

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(800) 257.3253
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Price is based on payment via ACH, Bank Wire Transfer or Personal Check.
Major Credit Cards Accepted, add 3.5%
Offer subject to availability.