Over $5.6 Million in U.S. Coins Sold in Baltimore

Posted on June 6, 2019 courtesy of Numismatic News Staff

Santa Ana, CA –  Collectors from across the country descended on Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the days leading up to Memorial Day, where two days of exciting auction sessions in their May 2019 Official Auction of the Whitman Coins & Collectibles Summer Expo. Highlighted by the Drummer, Fairmont and Newmark Collections, over $5.6 million in United States coins and Numismatic Americana were sold, kicking off an exciting summer season of auction events for the firm. All prices include the 20% buyer’s premium.

The Baltimore Auction featured an astounding selection of Flying Eagle and Indian Head cents. Several rarities from these series were presented in Session 1, including a Proof-65 RD (PCGS) 1865 cent which brought $13,200 (lot 29) and a Gem MS-66+ RD (PCGS) 1898 cent that realized $10,800 (lot 80).

A surviving Proof 1865 Indian cent, this coin is a significant example of the rare Snow-PR1 die pairing.  Sold for $13,200. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)

Small cents continued to shine in Session 2, which featured the Rarities Night portion of the sale followed the Fairmont Collection of US Gold Coinage.

A beautiful Proof-66 (PCGS) 1856 Flying Eagle cent sold for $50,400 in lot 1005, and a Proof-65 BN (PCGS) CAC 1864 Indian Head cent with L on Ribbon earned $45,600 in lot 1016. Strong demand was demonstrated for key-dates and iconic rarities throughout the session, as was demonstrated by the $99,000 price realized by the MS-66+ FH (PCGS) CAC 1916 Standing Liberty quarter in lot 1059.

The star of the evening was the incredible 1879 Flowing Hair Stella offered in lot 1089. Certified Proof-66 UCAM by NGC with only three examples finer, it brought $234,000.

Three exceptional $50 slugs from the 1915 Panama Pacific Exposition were offered in the session, highlighted by a MS-64 (PCGS) Octagonal example (lot 1135), that earned $90,000. Bringing the session to the close was the Fairmont Collection, featuring desirable key-date issues from the Liberty Head gold series. An AU-58 (PCGS) CAC 1854-S double eagle was the highlight of this offering, realizing $21,600 in lot 1177.

The production of small-diameter cent patterns began in 1850, and by 1856 the desire to create a new format cent for circulation was great. The Mint in Philadelphia struck close to 1,000 examples of James B. Longacre’s Flying Eagle design type for distribution to important individuals.  (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)
An eagerly sought key date issue, this 1916 Standing Liberty quarter sold for $99,000.  Just 52,000 of this year were minted. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)

As a “type coin,” the 1879 Flowing Hair Stella is a significant numismatic rarity, even more so from a market availability standpoint given the strong demand among advanced collectors. Sold for $234,000. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)
The San Francisco Mint struck 1,500 examples of this 1915-S Panama-Pacific $50 for sale at the Exposition.  The original asking price was $100, but later discounted when offered within sets. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)

The most highly anticipated item of the sale was offered in Session 4, where an original striking of the Washington Before Boston medal in silver was presented (lot 3031). A newly discovered piece, this example was certified Specimen-61 by PCGS and is one of just 11 examples known. After intense activity, it sold for $156,000.

Attracting similar excitement was the 1905 Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural medal in lot 3060. Designed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, produced by Tiffany, and struck in bronze, it realized $31,200.

As reported in last week’s Numismatic News Express, this example of the famous Washington Before Boston Medal in silver drew $156,000 in the auction. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)

Selling for $31,200, an American Classic MCMV (1905) Theodore Roosevelt inaugural bronze medal is one of just 150 examples authorized to be produced by Tiffany in bronze. It was found in the consignor’s grandmother’s jewelry box after her passing. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)

The session was brought to a close with an exciting offering of colonial and early American coins, including a selection of New Jersey coppers from the Collection of Larry L. Terrell. Highlights from the Terrell Collection included an EF-45 (PCGS) 1786 Maris 15-T that brought $5,280 (lot 3201) and a Condition Census EF-40 (PCGS) 1787 Maris 73-aa that realized $8,400 (lot 3241). A VF-30 (PCGS) Albany Church Penny in lot 3255 brought $21,600 and an AU-53 (PCGS) Washington Funeral Urn medal with GW on the Base earned $26,400 in lot 3268, claiming the top price among colonial issues.

The Albany Church pennies are attributed to the First Presbyterian Church of Albany, New York and were produced as a result of a resolution passed by the church elders on January 4, 1790. These pieces were intended to provide parishioners with coppers to place in the Sunday offering plates. (Image courtesy of Stack’s Bowers)
A 1787 New Jersey Copper Maris 73-aa, which was overstruck on an 1787 Connecticut Copper realized $8,400 at the Stack’s Bowers Whitman Expo on May 24. (Image courtesy of Stack’s ToppinBowers)


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *